C.C. Minor House

On the second day of the Johnson Land Purchase, July 1871, Jacob R. Crumley purchased lots 150, 151, and 152. These lots stood at the corner of Lee Street and Mary Street in Bristol, Virginia. Dr. C. C. Minor purchased lots 150 and 151, total 5/8 of an acre from the Town of Goodson in Apri1, 1879. Shortly thereafter, in January 1880, a lawsuit concerning payment of the property was filed. In these court documents, there is mention of a house on the property in question.

C.C. Minor House

Dr. C. C. Minor was one of the pioneers in Bristol's history and was founder of the Minor Drug store. Dr. Minor, son of W. L. Minor, moved to Bristol in 1862 from Hollins, Virginia. During the final periods of the Civil War, he and his kin underwent numerous hardships. Following the war, Dr. Minor managed to see his way clear to go to Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia. When he completed his courses there, he returned to Bristol and taught school for several years. Not satisfied with the meager income of a school teacher, Dr. Minor conceived the idea of going into the drug business. He opened a small store (1882) on the present site of the Cowan-Grant Company. At this time, he was past forty years of age, and after several "struggling years," the business grew into an established firm. Albenia Minor, wife of C. C. Minor, died intestate, leaving as sole heir Mary Lucie Crockett. The property was sold in 1934 to the First National Bank of Bristol, and many owners followed.

The house that now stands at 522 Lee Street is owned by Gary and Robin Bagnell. The house originally faced Mary Street. It is this portion of the house that is described in court documents. This 1879 structure consisted of four rooms, three handmade brick fireplaces, wide Poplar flooring, and an indoor staircase. The placing of the staircase was discovered by the current owners in 1996 while remodeling the upstairs back room. Under the layers of linoleum were, again, the beautiful wooden boards, and in the corner of the room was evidence of the staircase. The kitchen was detached and was located in the back of the house. The two over two Victorian portion, now facing Lee Street, was added to the existing structure in about 1881. This segment contained four more fireplaces, and the ceilings were raised. A cantilever staircase (which has been altered) with a beautiful crown molding was included also. The original color of the house was a golden mustard yellow with deep green accents on the exterior bull’s-eyes. Two of the more interesting sites are the eves of the house which have carvings of the sun and the pigeon blood stained glass over the front door. The original porch was much larger than the current porch and had much turned detail work. Unfortunately, this was removed several years ago due to structural problems.